April 20, 2020

Lockdown Quiz – Answers!

Looks like the Lockdown Quiz was rather too daunting and appears to have defeated everyone! We didn’t get one completed or even semi completed response to the quiz. The Christie’s Christmas Quiz from 1978 was indeed a fiendish beast, and if I’m honest, I don’t think, even with the help of Google it was possible to answer many of the questions.  There certainly were some really perplexing questions; who knew, for example that Augustus John and King George V were the only British Army Officers that were allowed to keep their beards in World War One (Question 23)? Or the answer to question 84 – ‘If James Yates is 5338, who is 2341’?….the numbers are pewterers numbers, so, obviously, 2341 is Robert Hitchman!….of course!…

There were some rather standard empirical art history questions, which I guess many people would be able to answer quite easily – Question 26, for example, which asked to match up the ‘ism’ to the artist; or question 14, which asked to name the artist who painted particular paintings – such questions seemed pretty easy to deal with, especially with the help of Google – but many other questions seemed to be rather obtuse – I particularly liked question 16 – ‘L.S.D. stands for what?’….no, it was not acid (Lysergic Acid Diethylamide), but ‘Librae. Solidi. Denarii.’

Some of the questions were too obviously time specific – question 22, for example ‘What is the record for an ‘elephant’ – one needed to know that an ‘elephant’ is a folio size, and that the record at auction in 1978 was £216,393; or question 61, ‘Which proved more expensive: vultures, bantam cocks or cocatoos’ – (they are all birds modelled by the Meissen porcelain factory, and hence, it’s Vultures….of course!).

Anyway, I know you will all be waiting to see the answers to the quiz, to see how you did – so here are the answers!….Hope you did well, even if you didn’t submit your answers for the prize!

Answers 1-40:

Answers 41-100:

They were really hard, weren’t they!

Mark

April 13, 2020

Lockdown Art and Antiques Quiz – Christie’s Christmas Quiz 1978

In these challenging days of ‘Lockdown’ we all need distractions – so how about an art history and antique collecting quiz, from back in the day – from 1978 to be precise, and a fiendishly difficult one too!  The Christie’s (auctioneers) ‘Christmas Quiz 1978’, which is a real mind boggler!

1978 – think Space Invaders, think Grease and Saturday Night Fever at the cinema, Charlie’s Angels and Love Boat on TV, boogie woogie disco clothes, and public services strikes in the UK – so what on earth was the state of knowledge in the art and antique markets in Britain at the time – well, exceptionally wide and very extensive if we go by the standard of the questions in the Christie’s 1978 Quiz!……here’s just one example to perplex you!…Question 33 – ‘What do Bawbee, Merk and Plack have in common?’….what on earth?…..and there are much more difficult questions!
The quiz has 100 questions, all related to art, antiques and collecting, with a few questions on wine too (as one might expect in a cultural quiz!).

There’s a prize for the winner – a print copy of the recently published SOLD! Great British Antiques Story exhibition catalogue will be posted to the winner (anywhere in the world!) – you have ONE WEEK (so the quiz deadline is Monday 20th April – 12.00pm UK time) to complete the quiz (I’d be very surprised if anyone managed to get all 100 questions correct!).  Email your answers to the project email address:

antiquedealers@leeds.ac.uk

The winner will be announced here on the project blog on Monday 20th April at 5.00pm – GOOD LUCK! – I have all of the answers to the quiz of course and will publish them on here on Monday 20th April – I’m guessing people will try to google some of the answers, but I’d be surprised if all of the questions can be googled!

Anyway, here you go…here’s all the questions, in each of the pages from the 1978 quiz

Questions 1-13

 

Questions 14-30

Questions 31-42

Questions 43-57

Questions 58-72

Questions 73-87

Questions 88-100

GOOD LUCK!

Mark

 

April 5, 2020

SOLD! Exhibition Catalogue

The SOLD! exhibition catalogue is now published –

and thanks to the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, and the AHRC (Arts & Humanities Research Council) we are able to make the digital E-Version of the SOLD! catalogue free for everyone – you can download the PDF version (9Mb at 72dpi) – here’s the PDF below; Enjoy!

SOLD Catalogue – WEB 72dpi revised

March 8, 2020

Quinneys – costumes

Our progress on re-staging our performance of Quinneys is coming along well; yesterday (a Saturday no less!) India Walton and I went to the Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire stores to choose the costumes for all the characters in the play – India is playing the part of ‘Mable Dredge’, Quinney’s typist, who in the play is in the triangle of love between James (Quinney’s foreman – played by Fergus Johnston) and Posy (Quinney’s daugther – played by Annabel Marlow) – here, (below) is India (left), with Annabel (centre) and Fergus (right) in rehearsals earlier in the week.

India, Annabel and Fergus in rehearsals for Quinneys.

India and I spent all day in the costume store – it was exhausting (10.15am til 4.00pm!) but great fun! And we managed to find costumes for every character in the play.  Here’s India, choosing a nightdress for ‘Mable Dredge’, with Steff, from the costume hire, who was such a fantastic help all day! All the costume we needed dates from the Edwardian period (the play is set in 1914), and there are brilliant resources at the Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire.

India and Steff and Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire

India and Steff and Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire

We hope that the actors (and George Rodosthenous, our theater director for the performance of Quinneys) all approve of the costumes that India and I chose.

We’ve made the characters of the American millionaire collectors, ‘Cyrus P. Hunsaker’ and ‘Dupont Jordan’ (played by Stephenson Catney and Jake Pursell, respectively) rather bold, brash and ostentatious……with a brightly coloured jacket in red, yellow and black check pattern, and a similar jacket in brown and yellow checks – they will look out-rage-ous in the play! – especially as ‘Cyrus’ accepts a large ‘cheque’ (a ‘check in American parlance) from Mr Quinney at one point in the play….

For ‘Quinney’ himself (played by Samuel Parmenter) we decided he should be very smartly and expensively dressed, but rather more soberly – so we put him in a light grey morning suit – a dapper chap, but with a restrained, serious personality. For Mrs Susan Quinney (played by Hannah Rooney) we went for two Edwardian dresses, both in an elegant green – one with fabulous black embroidery to the sleeves.

And for ‘Posy’ (Quinney’s daugther, played by Annabel Marlow) we found a light and delicate pale blue dress, together with some some Edwardian blouses in white, with small red flowers, and a cream-coloured long flowing Edwardian skirt. We also found suitable dresses for ‘Mable Dredge’ – slightly more plain, given Mable’s status as Quinney’s typist, but still very elegant – (India enjoyed choosing her costume!)…. And finally we found a very swish black jacket with black velvet trousers for ‘Sam Tomlin’ the smart (and smarmy) Bond Street antique dealer, (played by Morgan Buswell), and for ‘James Miggott’ (Quinney’s foreman…played by Fergus Johnston) we found a suitable ‘workman’s’ outfit, but one that still retains a degree of Edwardian elegance….

Here are all the costume’s on the rail at Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire –

Quinneys play costume at Leeds Playhouse Costume Hire.

We still need a few Edwardian hats and accessories, but the costume for the performance is all coming together well – I’m sure that the actors will thoroughly enjoy their rehearsals now that we have costumes – and that their performances will become even more authentic and ’embodied’!

Mark

 

March 4, 2020

More Quinneys Rehearsals

Our rehearsals for the performance of Quinneys are continuing apace – (the play is to be staged at The Witham, Barnard Castle, on Saturday 28th March – to book tickets, click to the weblink to The Witham here).  George Rodosthenous, (Director of the theatre and performance BA/MA programmes at the University of Leeds), and the director of the play, has been ramping up the number of rehearsals over the last two weeks, as the student actors begin to inhabit their characters in ever increasing degrees of authenticity!  Here (below) is one of George’s professional black and white photographs of (almost) the full cast of Quinneys (only Jake, who has recently joined the cast to play the part of Dupont Jordan, is absent…but you can see Jake further in this blog post, below) – in the photo below are, left to right, India (Mable Dredge, Quinney’s typist), Stephenson (Cyrus P. Hunsaker, American millionaire collector), Annabel (Posy, Quinney’s daughter) on Fergus’s (James, Quinney’s foreman) knee; with Samuel (Quinney) and Hannah (Mrs Susan Quinney) behind, and Morgan (Sam Tomlin, fellow antique dealer) to the right.

The cast of Quinneys in rehearsals at the University of Leeds.

And here’s the cast in rehearsals again, this time without Samuel (Quinney) but with Jake Pursell (playing the role of the American millionaire collector, Dupont Jordan) in the centre, on his knees examining a chair – Jake is an MA student, and has immediately immersed himself in the role…being from Texas, USA, himself!

The cast of Quinneys – without Samuel (Quinney), but with Jake (Dupont Jordan).

In the photograph (below) Jake (Dupont) and Stephenson (as Cyrus P. Hunsaker, another American collector in the play), greet Annabel (Posy), with India (Mable) and Fergus (James) to the right – and George, directing the play (but here playing Quinney). In the foreground is an inanimate ‘actor’, (a reproduction ‘Persian’ vase) taking the part of the rare ‘Kang Hsi, mirror-black bottle’ that also stars in the play.

Jake, George, Stephenson, Annabel, Fergus and India in Quinneys rehearsals

Indeed, in this week’s rehearsals we used some stand-in props for the real antiques that we will be using as part of the set for the play. In the 1910 and 1920s, when Quinneys was first performed, several leading antique dealers, such as Moss Harris and Walter Thornton-Smith, provided appropriate antiques for the set – and for our performance at The Witham, we have been lucky that several antique dealers, and also the Bowes Museum itself, have agreed to loan antiques for the play.  For rehearsals of course, we need ‘stand-ins’, and in the photograph (below), Samuel (Quinney) and Stephenson (Hunsaker) discuss a rare Charles II walnut armchair (which will be on loan from the Bowes Museum) using a large blown-up photograph (fixed to the cream seminar room chair, between them) of the very chair that will be in the performance!

Samuel (Quinney) and Stephenson (Hunsaker) discuss an ‘antique’ chair in rehearsals for Quinneys.

We did manage to use one real antique in the rehearsals – a 19th century key, one that Posy places in the Kang Hsi ‘mirror black, bottle’ and which opens an antique lacquer cabinet that is one of the stars of the show (in terms of inanimate objects at least) and into which she has placed a love letter to James – and here’s the very key – appropriately, given that it is the key that opens a cabinet into which a love letter rests, shaped like a ‘heart’!

The key to Posy’s Heart – from Quinneys!

One of the aspects of the performance that we will be debating and discussing in the proposed workshop on Sunday 29th March – the day following the re-staging of Quinneys – is the complexity of the idea of ‘authenticity’ in a workshop titled ‘Dealing with Authenticity’ and led by our colleague Professor Jonathan Pitches (Professor of Performance at the University of Leeds) – so having the actors working with ‘fake’ antiques, and then working with the genuine thing, will be something we might ruminate upon; as well, of course, as what it means to embody, to become, a character in a play as part of a performance.

Indeed, what is especially interesting (for me) is that the fictional character of the antique dealer Joseph Quinney is actually based on a real life antique dealer, called Thomas Rohan, who was trading in Bournemouth and Southampton at the time that Horace Vachell composed his play (and associated novel) – and, as if to reinforce the point, here is Samuel, holding a photocopy of a photograph of Thomas Rohan, of about 1920 – Samuel becoming Thomas Rohan, becoming Joseph Quinney!

Samuel, as Quinney, as Rohan.

And here’s a few more photographs of the student actors in rehearsals – they are all fantastic actors and are performing brilliantly – you will miss something special if you don’t get to see the play!….seats are going fast, so do book before they all go!

Hannah (Mrs Susan Quinney) and Samuel (Quinney) in rehearsal.

Annabel (Posy), Hannah (Mrs Quinney) and Fergus (James) in rehearsals for Quinneys.

India (Mable), Annabel (Posy) and Fergus (James) in rehearsals for Quinneys.

And finally, an amusing shot, from an amusing scene in the play, with Annabel (Posy) and Fergus (James) in foreground, with Samuel (Quinney) and Hannah (Mrs Quinney) in the background, sneaking a look at the two young lovers – (in the play, the whiteboard will be an 18th century  Chinese lacquer screen…..we hope!)

Mark

Annabel (Posy) and Fergus (James), with Samuel (Quinney) and Hannah (Mrs Quinney) in the background – rehearsals for Quinneys.

 

February 9, 2020

Quinneys Rehearsals

Our rehearsals for the play Quinneys continue apace – with Dr George Rodosthenous leading the direction of the performances.  This week George assembled the whole team, including Professor Jonathan Pitches, who is taking the lead on the ‘Dealing with Authenticity’ workshop which takes place at The Bowes Museum on the day following the restaging of Quinneys at the Witham in Barnard Castle.  Here’s the whole team at the rehearsals –

The Quinneys team – back (Annabel, Mark, Fergus), middle (Stephenson, Hannah, Samuel), Front (George, Jonathan, India, Morgan).

George (centre) directing India (sitting) and Morgan (back) and Fergus (right) in rehearsals for Quinneys.

George had the cast reading sections of the play, revealing insights into the characterisations, and drawing out some great performances from the actors.

Annabel and Fergus reading for ‘Posy’ and ‘James’.

Here’s (left) Annabel and Fergus taking on the character of ‘Posy’ (Quinneys’ daughter) and ‘James Miggot’ (Quinney’s workshop foreman).  And (right), George, directing India (seated), playing ‘Mable Dredge’ (Quinney’s typist), and Morgan (background) playing ‘Cyrus P. Hunsaker’ the American millionaire collector, with Fergus as ‘James’.

And another few photos of the cast getting into character – with (left to right) India, Samuel (as the eponymous Joseph Quinney), Morgan, Annabel and Fergus, rehearsing a scene set in ‘Quinney’s sanctuary’ – Quinney’s collector’s paradise, full of extraordinary antiques.

Quinneys actors – (left to right) India, Samuel, Morgan, Annabel, Fergus.

We are working with The Bowes Museum and local antique dealers in Barnard Castle to source the antiques for the stage set.  In 1915, when the play was first performed, several well-known London antique dealers loaned antiques for the set, including Walter and Ernest Thornton-Smith, who, co-incidently (or maybe not) traded in Soho Square, London, which was also the fictional location of Quinney’s  antique  shop in the novel ‘Quinneys’ (1915).  Indeed, one of the aspects we are thinking through in the restaging of Quinneys is the notion of authenticity – Jonathan Pitches will be working with the actors, reflecting on authenticity of performance and authenticity of character in acting, alongside me (Mark) working on authenticity of objects (antiques) and authenticity of identity (of antique dealers), in the ‘Dealing with Authenticity’ workshop on the day following the performance at The Bowes Museum.

To that end, George got me to work with an imaginary ‘antique chair’, examining it as if I were an antique dealer, for the student actors – (that’s as much acting as I am going to do!) –

Mark, explaining how an antique dealer examines an ‘antique’ chair……

Hannah, another of the student actors, also joined in the rehearsals, playing the part of Susan Quinney, Quinney’s wife – here’s Annabel (left) as ‘Posy’, with Hannah (right) as ‘Susan’, reading from a scene in Act 1.

Annabel (left) and Hannah (right) rehearsing for Quinneys.

George and the actors are certainly creating a fantastic atmosphere, and I am sure that when Quinneys is eventually performed on Saturday 28th March at The Witham, is will be a brilliant production!  Here’s a final few photos of George and the team.

George (centre) with the student actors at the rehearsals for Quinneys.

And a final, much more professional photograph, of Stephenson, India and Samuel (back row), with Annabel and Fergus (front).

part of the cast for Quinneys – Stephenson, India, Samuel (back) with Annabel and Fergus (front)

Don’t forget to book your tickets for Quinneys – you can book your seat HERE

Mark

February 6, 2020

Antique Dealer Archives at the Brotherton Special Collections

Our colleagues in the Brotherton Library Special Collections (BLSC) have been doing amazing work on the conservation and cataloguing of the antique dealer archives in their collections over the past year – cleaning and conserving the Phillips of Hitchin and the Roger Warner archives, as well as creating online catalogue entries for the material. Karen Sayers, one of the archivists in BLSC recently composed an introductory blog post on the Roger Warner collection on the Leeds University Library Blog – you can read Karen’s blog here – Leeds University Library Blog and a catalogue entry detail on the Roger Warner material – catalogue entry

Roger Warner’s antique shop in Burford, c.1970.

Karen has been very busy with the antique dealer archives recently; she has also created a Wikipedia entry on Roger Warner, see Roger Warner wikipedia

The Leeds University Library team and volunteers have also posted a couple of other updates on the work done on the antique dealer archives – here’s the post by Kiri Douglas, conservation student from Camberwell College of Art, London, recounting her work on conservation of the Phillips of Hitchin archive in 2018 – read Kiri’s blog post here.   And Karen Sayer’s blog post on the progress of the conservation of the Phillips of Hitchin archive back in 2018 – read Karen’s blog post here.

Phillips of Hitchin shop, Hitchin, c.1910. Digital copy of glass-plate negative courtesy of the V&A Museum.

It’s thanks to all in the Brotherton Library Special Collections that these rare and fascinating antique dealer archives are becoming more available to researchers and the general public and are proving to be an incredibly rich resource for the various research projects that we are undertaking.

Mark

January 30, 2020

Quinneys Auditions

Preparations for the re-staging of the play Quinneys (first performed on 20th April 1915 at The Haymarket Theatre in London) at the Witham Theatre in Barnard Castle on Saturday 28th March are coming along well – we had some good publicity from The Antiques Trade Gazette (thank you to Frances Allitt) and the bookings are coming in well – don’t forget to book your ticket – you can book via The Witham  HERE or the link via the Year of the Dealer Project website HERE

Poster for Quinneys, Birmingham performance, 1920.

Over the past few weeks George Rodosthenous (who is directing our re-staging of the play Quinneys)  and I have been auditioning some of the students from George’s BA (Hons) Theatre and Performance at the University of Leeds for the acting parts in Quinneys. We think we have just about finished casting the play now, and have some wonderful student actors – all brilliant in fact!  Yesterday we auditioned Annabel Marlow, India Walton, Samuel Parmenter and Fergus Johnston – in the weeks before we’d seen Stephenson Catney, Morgan Buswell and Hannah Rooney (I did a few tweets on the research project Twitter feed, if you want to see them!)

Here’s Fergus, Annabel, India and Samuel, from yesterday, chatting about the play in one of the audition rooms at the University, and with George, ‘directing’ Annabel and India…!

Fergus, Annabel, India and Sammy in the auditions for Quinneys

 

Fergus and Annabel have been cast to play the parts of James (Quinney’s workshop foreman) and Posy (Quinney’s daughter) and did some brilliant improvisation (directed by George!) at the auditions. India and Samuel took the parts of ‘Mable Dredge’ (Quinney’s typist) and Joseph Quinney himself. Here’s Fergus and Annabel and India and Sammy reading for the parts!

Fergus and Annabel, reading for ‘James’ and ‘Posy’.

 

India (Mable) and Samuel (Quinney) in the auditions.

The part of Susan (Quinneys wife) has been won by Hannah, with Morgan playing ‘Sam Tomlin’ (Quinney’s brother-in-law, and also an antique dealer, like Quinney), with Stephenson playing ‘Cyrus P. Hunsaker’ (an American millionaire collector and rival to James for Posy’s affections) – we’re still looking for an actor to play ‘Dupont Jordan’ an American millionaire, but will find someone soon….

George introduced some music into the auditions (he played the piano) and we had Annabel singing ‘I love James’ to the tune of the popular 19th century lullaby, ‘Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star’… (great performance!); and India, Fergus and Sammy all made the parts of ‘Mable’, ‘James’ and Quinney’ their own!

We’ve now got to sort out the stage set (using genuine antiques, thanks to The Bowes Museum!), and work up a theatre programme for the performance, and what seems like a million other things to sort out before the performance on 28th March – but George has already started the rehearsals for the play, and we’re very much looking forward to working with everyone on this one – Quinneys is, after all, the centrepiece for the Year of the Dealer project!

Mark

 

 

December 17, 2019

Quinneys is now open for bookings!

We thought you would be interested to hear that the bookings for the re-staging of the play ‘Quinneys’ are now open. The performance will be at The Witham Community Theatre in Barnard Castle, County Durham. You can book here:

Playbill for the performance of Quinneys at Birmingham theatre in 1925.

As you may know, we are re-staging the play as part of the AHRC funded ‘SOLD! The Year of the Dealer: antique dealers, art markets and museums’ project, which runs until May 2020.  The performance will be by student actors from the University of Leeds, School of Performance & Cultural Industries; the play is to be directed by Dr George Rodosthenous, who leads on the MA in Theatre Directing at the University of Leeds.
   Quinneys was written in 1914 by the prolific writer Horace A. Vachell and is about the life and activities of the fictional antique dealer ‘Joseph Quinney’.  It was regularly performed during the period 1914 until the 1950s – it even made it to theatres in New York!  The character of Joe Quinney was based on the real-life antique dealer Thomas Rohan, who was trading in Bournemouth and Southampton during the early 1900s until the 1930s – for more on Quinneys and Thomas Rohan do take a look at some of the previous posts in the antique dealers research blog.
And as fiction mirrors fact, the play (and the subsequent novel of the same name, published by Horace Vachell in 1915) led to the growth in the number of antique shops called ‘Quinneys’ – we have so far traced about 20 shops called ‘Quinneys’ in the UK…as far as we know there’s only one left…Quinneys of Warwick, which is still trading after nearly 90 years!….
We hope that you will be able to make it to the performance of Quinneys. There is a wine reception at 6.30pm, prior to the performance, where you can have a glass of wine and some nibbles and chat and meet with many people involved in, or following the ‘Antique Dealers Research Projects’.  The Year of the Dealer project is covering the costs for the wine reception and all performance fees and costs, but as The Witham is a community theatre, we are hoping to support them with some funding and have agreed with them that there should be a nominal £5.00 cost for the tickets for the performance – all the ticket monies will go towards the projects at the The Witham.
The performance will take place on SATURDAY 28th March 2020. Wine Reception at 6.30pm; Play at 7.30pm; close by 9.30pm at the latest.
We do hope that you will be able to make it – and enjoy a rare performance of a key document on the history and characterization of Antique Dealers!
Mark
November 23, 2019

Year of the Dealer In Conversation event at Lady Lever Art Gallery

The first of our THREE In Conversation events as part of the AHRC funded ‘Year of the Dealer’ project (2019-2020) was held at the Lady Lever Art Gallery, Port Sunlight, near Liverpool on Thursday 21st November -there are TWO further In Conversation events; one at Temple Newsam, Leeds on Thursday 23rd April 2020; and a final In Conversation at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, on Thursday 7th May 2020.

The In Conversation events are themed around an on-going, public-facing conversation on the historical and contemporary relationships between the art market and museums and the wider research project to investigate the history of antique dealing in Britain in the 19th and 20th centuries – a subject explored in the original AHRC funded project ‘Antique Dealers: the British Antique Trade in the 20th century, a cultural geography’ (2013-2016) and the various research initiatives and projects that both underpinned and have been subsequently developed from, this fascinating and previously very little studied area of British cultural life – you can of course follow all the projects associated with this strand of research in our new project website ‘Antique Dealers’ at the University of Leeds.

Our In Conversation at the Lady Lever Art Gallery was focused on the collecting activities of William Hesketh Lever (1851-1925), the founder of the Lady Lever Art Gallery – with a theme of collecting and the art market ‘Then & Now’ – the market for decorative art (or Antiques as one might also call them) in the late 19th and early 20th century and the market for decorative art/antiques today. We had a very distinguished panel of experts for the In Conversation – from right to left in the photograph below are Sandra Penketh, Director of Art Galleries and Collections Care at National Museums, Liverpool; Robin Emmerson, curator emeritus, Lady Lever Art Gallery; Colin Simpson, Principal Museums Officer, Wirral Museums; Prof Nick Pearce, Professor of Art History at Glasgow University; Peter Woods, antique dealer and collector and me – Mark Westgarth, University of Leeds.  We also had an excellent and packed audience of interested and interesting people – including lots of people from the local area and with associations with the Lady Lever Art Gallery – but it was good to see people from much further afield too – some had travelled all the way from London and the South East of England! Thank you to everyone on the Panel and everyone who attended for making the event such a success!

In Conversation at the Lady Lever Art Gallery, 21st November 2019.

The discussion and debate was lively and informative, with each of the participants on the Panel offering reflections on the art market, collecting and museums from historical and contemporary perspectives (from various ‘stakeholders’ if you like – museum professionals, academics, and professional antique dealers and collectors) .  There were also some great questions from the assembled audience.  I don’t think we exhausted the theme at all (certainly not in the relatively short time we had for the ‘In Conversation’) – indeed, its just as well we have many more events and activities as part of the ‘Year of the Dealer’ project!

It was great to see the project had so engaged the participants, and bodes well for future events.  I’d like to thank everyone at the Lady Lever Art Gallery – Sandra Penketh, Alyson Pollard, Dave Moffat – and the events team at Lady Lever – Joel, Caroline, Nina and Kimmi – and all the support staff, for all of their help with the development and delivery of the In Conversation.  And of course the Year of the Dealer project team, Eleanor, Vanessa, Simon and Gemma, for all their hard work too.

Do keep a look out for future events as part of the ‘Year of the Dealer’ project each of the In Conversation events are free to attend (bookings will open soon for the Temple Newsam and V&A Museum events) – we also have a wine reception for each on the In Conversations (if you needed any further incentive to come along of course!).  We hope to see you at Temple Newsam and at the V&A Museum next year.  Do keep you eye on the events pages on the Year of the Dealer project website.

Mark

Home Subjects

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A research project investigating the history of the antiques trade in Britain in the 19th & 20th centuries